Tag Archives: Women of Color

Rebuking the Spirt of Fear

spirit of fear(A picture of a  white dove against a bright blue sky, with white clouds and a slight rainbow with the words:  “For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of sound mind.”  2 Timothy 1:7 (KJV))

Several years ago, I accompanied my youngest daughter, who was then in undergraduate school, on a trip to Cherokee, North Carolina.  By the time we arrived back at her school, it was already getting dark.  She suggested that I stay with her or that I stay with my oldest daughter who lived about an hour away.  I insisted that I needed to head to my mother’s house, which was about two and a half hours away on some rather dark, long country roads.

About halfway through my journey, at one of the darkest and most lonely spots, I had a blowout.  I was able to safely stir the car to the side of the road.  However, despite the fact that I had four (count them) phones with four (count them again) different carriers, I was unable to call either AAA for assistance or my mother to let her know what had happened.  Since I was not sure of my ability to change a tire and it was very, very dark, I felt I had no choice but to drive (on my flat tire) back towards the nearest town.

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Why My Voice Should Count For More Than One Vote

Black and white hand drawn comic with 12 men and one woman sitting around a table. All of the men are looking at the woman. Text reads, "Well, you're the only one who thinks we're a sexist organisation."

This comic has appeared in my newsfeed several times in the last week. It captures what many of us feel when we are the minority in any given situation. It captures the overwhelming feeling of loneliness when faced with the contrast of your difference. It captures why I don’t want a seat at the table.

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Overcoming the Election Year Blues

I voted in my first presidential election in 1976. I  proudly cast my vote for Jimmy Carter for President.  I have voted in EVERY election (in which I was eligible to vote) since that time.  I have taken taxicabs and public transportation to my polling place; I have begged and cajoled friends and relatives to take me to my polling place; I have driven through blinding rain and other inclement weather to get to my polling place; and I have stood in very long lines to cast my vote (even when I had to wear a back brace to do so).

I have enthusiastically supported my favorite candidates with donations to their campaigns — with their bumper stickers on my car — with their yard signs in my yard — with their T-shirts as part of my wardrobe. (In the 2008 and 2012 elections, there were so many bumper stickers on my car that my friends (and a few frenemies) referred to it as the “Obamamobile.”

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Transcending Time Through Gumbo

   March is Women’s History month. As I think about this in the context of Mormonism, I think about how personal history is such an important part of our religious practice. This personal history becomes part of our individual narratives. Unfortunately, my attempts to collect my personal history do not extend beyond this continent. Even genealogy is a penetrating reminder of the continual tragedy of slavery and its far reaching effects. Despite this, I have realized that I have found connection to the women from my personal history through personal ritual. Sure, it doesn’t reach far beyond the continent and beyond the grips of slavery, but it makes me feel closer to the women who have gone before me.

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“Doers of the Word” – Continuation of Book Discussion

Thank you for joining us for our discussion of the book “Doers of the Word”: African-American Women Speakers and Writers in the North (1830-1880) by Carla L. Peterson during Black History Month.  Because the book is full to the brim with thought-provoking passages, because it is about African American women, and because March is Women’s History Month, we will be continuing our discussion.  For more details, check out our earlier post that outlines the book discussion concept.

As a kickoff to this month’s discussion, I want to share (again) one of the quotes from the book that struck a chord with me.

The quote is from Sarah Parker Remond  and it addressed her ongoing struggle against racial prejudice and oppression in these poignant words:

In joy or sorrow, whether pursuing the pleasures or business of life, it [prejudice against colour] has thrust itself like a huge sphinx, darkening my pathway, and, at times, almost overwhelming the soul constantly called to meet such a conflict.

I have been blessed with many opportunities.  In the midst of those blessings, however, I find myself constantly battling the ever-present racial prejudice and oppression that I have experienced throughout my fifty-eight years on earth. 

As Remond wrote, there are days when the racial prejudice and oppression threaten to overwhelm me and to crush my spirit.  But like Remond and the other women who are the subjects of “Doers of the Word” and like so many other women of color around the world, I just “keep on keeping on.”

I invite you to join in the continuing exploration of “Doers of the Word” so that we may, collectively and individually, learn from the courageous women highlighted therein and develop our own strategies for overcoming not only racial prejudice and oppression but all forms of prejudice and oppression.

Ready for Revelation – 1 PoV by 1 PoC

I originally wrote this post for Ordain Women. It explains one of the reasons I support women’s ordination. This was originally posted on OrdainWomen.org on February 1, 2016. 

The story of black women within the Mormon church has often been ignored. Instead, we focus on those whose oppressions are easily categorized without intersections. The racial oppression of black men through their exclusion of the Priesthood and the pious suffering of white women as they endured the sacrifices and the sexism of polygamy take center stage. At best, black women are a distant afterthought.

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“Doers of the Word” – Chapters 5 and 6

Thank you for joining us for our discussion of the book “Doers of the Word”: African-American Women Speakers and Writers in the North (1830-1880) by Carla L. Peterson. If you are confused about this Black History Month segment, please see our earlier post that outlines the book discussion concept.

Doers of the wordCarla L. Peterson’s book – ““Doers of the Word”: African-American Women Speakers and Writers in the North (1830-1880) – is not for the casual reader.  It does not lend itself to speed reading or skimming; instead, it requires a commitment of time and effort on the part of the reader.  For me, however, the knowledge that I have gained is well worth the time and effort. Continue reading